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One-Step Problems

3rd Grade

Alabama Course of Study Standards: 1

Illustrate the product of two whole numbers as equal groups by identifying the number of groups and the number in each group and represent as a written expression.

Arkansas Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.1

Interpret products of whole numbers (e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each)

For example: Describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

Arizona - K-12 Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.1

Interpret products of whole numbers as the total number of objects in equal groups (e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each).

Common Core State Standards: Math.3.OA.1 or 3.OA.A.1

Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): 3.PAR.3.6

Solve practical, relevant problems involving multiplication and division within 100 using part-whole strategies, visual representations, and/or concrete models.

North Carolina - Standard Course of Study: 3.OA.1

For products of whole numbers with two factors up to and including 10:
  • Interpret the factors as representing the number of equal groups and the number of objects in each group.
  • Illustrate and explain strategies including arrays, repeated addition, decomposing a factor, and applying the commutative and associative properties.

New York State Next Generation Learning Standards: 3.OA.1

Interpret products of whole numbers.
e.g., Interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. Describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

Ohio's Learning Standards: 3.OA.1

Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 x 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. (Note: These standards are written with the convention that a x b means a groups of b objects each; however, because of the commutative property, students may also interpret 5 x 7 as the total number of objects in 7 groups of 5 objects each).

Tennessee Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.1

Interpret the factors and products in whole number multiplication equations (e.g., 4 × 7 is 4 groups of 7 objects with a total of 28 objects or 4 strings measuring 7 inches each with a total of 28 inches.)

Wisconsin Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.1

Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each.
For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

Alabama Course of Study Standards: 2

Illustrate and interpret the quotient of two whole numbers as the number of objects in each group or the number of groups when the whole is partitioned into equal shares.

Arkansas Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.2

Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers (e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each)

For example: Describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.

Arizona - K-12 Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.2

Interpret whole number quotients of whole numbers (e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each group when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 groups, or as a number of groups when 56 objects are partitioned into equal groups of 8 objects each). See Table 2.

Common Core State Standards: Math.3.OA.2 or 3.OA.A.2

Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): 3.PAR.3.2

Represent single digit multiplication and division facts using a variety of strategies. Explain the relationship between multiplication and division.

North Carolina - Standard Course of Study: 3.OA.2

For whole-number quotients of whole numbers with a one-digit divisor and a one-digit quotient:
  • Interpret the divisor and quotient in a division equation as representing the number of equal groups and the number of objects in each group.
  • Illustrate and explain strategies including arrays, repeated addition or subtraction, and decomposing a factor.

New York State Next Generation Learning Standards: 3.OA.2

Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers.
e.g., Interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. Describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.

Tennessee Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.2

Interpret the dividend, divisor, and quotient in whole number division equations (e.g., 28 ÷ 7 can be interpreted as 28 objects divided into 7 equal groups with 4 objects in each group or 28 objects divided so there are 7 objects in each of the 4 equal groups).

Wisconsin Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.2

Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each.
For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.

Alabama Course of Study Standards: 3

Solve word situations using multiplication and division within 100 involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities; represent the situation using models, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number.

Arkansas Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.3

Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities (e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem)

Arizona - K-12 Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.3

Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities. See Table 2.

Common Core State Standards: Math.3.OA.3 or 3.OA.A.3

Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): 3.PAR.3.3

Apply properties of operations (i.e., commutative property, associative property, distributive property) to multiply and divide within 100.

North Carolina - Standard Course of Study: 3.OA.3

Represent, interpret, and solve one-step problems involving multiplication and division.
  • Solve multiplication word problems with factors up to and including 10. Represent the problem using arrays, pictures, and/or equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
  • Solve division word problems with a divisor and quotient up to and including 10. Represent the problem using arrays, pictures, repeated subtraction and/or equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

New York State Next Generation Learning Standards: 3.OA.3

Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities.
e.g., using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem

Ohio's Learning Standards: 3.OA.3

Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. See Table 2, page 95. Drawings need not show details, but should show the mathematics in the problem. (This applies wherever drawings are mentioned in the Standards.)

Tennessee Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.3

Multiply and divide within 100 to solve contextual problems, with unknowns in all positions, in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., contexts including computations such as 3 × ? = 24, 6 × 16 = ?, ? ÷ 8 = 3, or 96 ÷ 6 = ?) (See Table 2 - Multiplication and Division Situations).

Alabama Course of Study Standards: 11

Use various strategies to add and subtract fluently within 1000.

Arkansas Academic Standards: 3.NBT.A.2

Using computational fluency, add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and the relationship between addition and subtraction

Note: Computational fluency is defined as a student’s ability to efficiently and accurately solve a problem with some degree of flexibility with their strategies.

Common Core State Standards: Math.3.NBT.2 or 3.NBT.A.2

Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): 3.PAR.2.1

Fluently add and subtract within 1000 to solve problems.

North Carolina - Standard Course of Study: 3.NBT.2

Add and subtract whole numbers up to and including 1,000.
  • Use estimation strategies to assess reasonableness of answers.
  • Model and explain how the relationship between addition and subtraction can be applied to solve addition and subtraction problems.
  • Use expanded form to decompose numbers and then find sums and differences.

New York State Next Generation Learning Standards: 3.NBT.2

Fluently add and subtract within 1,000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
Notes: Students should be taught to use strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and the relationship between addition and subtraction; however, when solving any problem, students can choose any strategy.
A range of algorithms may be used.

Tennessee Academic Standards: 3.NBT.A.2

Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

Wisconsin Academic Standards: 3.NBT.A.2

Flexibly and efficiently add and subtract within 1,000 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

Alabama Course of Study Standards: 18

Tell and write time to the nearest minute; measure time intervals in minutes (within 90 minutes.)
  1. Solve real-world problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes by representing the problem on a number line diagram.

Arkansas Academic Standards: 3.MD.A.1

  • Tell time using the terms quarter and half as related to the hour (e.g., quarter-past 3:00, half-past 4:00, and quarter till 3:00)
  • Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes
  • Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes (e.g., by representing the problem on a number line diagram)

Arizona - K-12 Academic Standards: 3.MD.A.1a

Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes (e.g., representing the problem on a number line diagram).

Common Core State Standards: Math.3.MD.1 or 3.MD.A.1

Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a number line diagram.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): 3.MDR.5.2

Tell and write time to the nearest minute and estimate time to the nearest fifteen minutes (quarter hour) from the analysis of an analog clock.

Louisiana Academic Standards: 3.MD.A.1

Understand time to the nearest minute.
  1. Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes, within 60 minutes, on an analog and digital clock.
  2. Calculate elapsed time greater than 60 minutes to the nearest quarter and half hour on a number line diagram.
  3. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a number line diagram.

North Carolina - Standard Course of Study: 3.MD.1

Tell and write time to the nearest minute. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals within the same hour.

New York State Next Generation Learning Standards: 3.MD.1

Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve one-step word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes.
e.g., representing the problem on a number line or other visual mode
Note: This includes one-step problems that cross into a new hour.

Ohio's Learning Standards: 3.MD.1

Work with time and money.
  1. Tell and write time to the nearest minute. Measure time intervals in minutes (within 90 minutes). Solve real-world problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals (elapsed time) in minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a number line diagram or clock.
  2. . Solve word problems by adding and subtracting within 1,000, dollars with dollars and cents with cents (not using dollars and cents simultaneously) using the $ and ? symbol appropriately (not including decimal notation).

Tennessee Academic Standards: 3.MD.A.1

Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve contextual problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes. For example, students may use a number line to determine the difference between the start time and the end time of lunch.

Wisconsin Academic Standards: 3.MD.A.1

Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a number line.

Alabama Course of Study Standards: 19

Estimate and measure liquid volumes and masses of objects using liters (l), grams (g), and kilograms (kg).
  1. Use the four operations to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes given in the same metric units.

Arkansas Academic Standards: 3.MD.A.2

  • Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units such as: grams (g), kilograms (kg), liters (l), gallons (gal), quarts (qt), pints (pt), and cups (c)
  • Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units (e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem)
Note: Conversions can be introduced but not assessed. Excludes compound units such as cubic centimeters and finding the geometric volume of a container. Excludes multiplicative comparison problems (problems involving notions of “times as much”).

Arizona - K-12 Academic Standards: 3.MD.A.2

Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using metric units. (Excludes compound units such as cm3 and finding the geometric volume of a container.) Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units. Excludes multiplicative comparison problems (problems involving notions of “times as much”). See Table 2.

Common Core State Standards: Math.3.MD.2 or 3.MD.A.2

Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): 3.MDR.5.5

Estimate and measure liquid volumes, lengths and masses of objects using customary units. Solve problems involving mass, length, and volume given in the same unit, and reason about the relative sizes of measurement units within the customary system.

Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks: 3.MD.A.2

Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard metric units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l).17 Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same metric units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem.18

North Carolina - Standard Course of Study: 3.MD.2

Solve problems involving customary measurement.
  • Estimate and measure lengths in customary units to the quarter-inch and half-inch, and feet and yards to the whole unit.
  • Estimate and measure capacity and weight in customary units to a whole number: cups, pints, quarts, gallons, ounces, and pounds.
  • Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving whole number measurements of length, weight, and capacity in the same customary units.

New York State Next Generation Learning Standards: 3.MD.2

  1. Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l).
    Note: Does not include compound units such as cm3
  2. Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or liquid volumes that are given in the same units.
    e.g., using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem
    Note: Does not include multiplicative comparison problems involving notions of "times as much."

Ohio's Learning Standards: 3.MD.2

Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams, kilograms, and liters. Add, subtract, multiply, or divide whole numbers to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem. Excludes multiplicative comparison problems involving notions of "times as much"; see Table 2, page 95.

Tennessee Academic Standards: 3.MD.A.2

Measure the mass of objects and liquid volume using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), milliliters (ml), and liters (l). Estimate the mass of objects and liquid volume using benchmarks. For example, a large paper clip is about one gram, so a box of about 100 large clips is about 100 grams.

Pennsylvania Core Standards: M03.A-T.1.1.2

Add two- and three-digit whole numbers (limit sums from 100 through 1,000) and/or subtract two- and three-digit numbers from three-digit whole numbers.

Pennsylvania Core Standards: CC.2.2.3.A.1

Represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division.

Pennsylvania Core Standards: M03.B-O.1.2.1

Use multiplication (up to and including 10 × 10) and/or division (limit dividends through 50 and limit divisors and quotients through 10) to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and/or measurement quantities.

Pennsylvania Core Standards: M03.D-M.1.1.2

Calculate elapsed time to the minute in a given situation (total elapsed time limited to 60 minutes or less).

Florida - Benchmarks for Excellent Student Thinking: MA.3.AR.1.2

Solve one-and two-step real-world problems involving any of four operations with whole numbers.

Florida - Benchmarks for Excellent Student Thinking: MA.3.M.1.2

Solve real-world problems involving any of the four operations with whole-number lengths, masses, weights, temperatures or liquid volumes.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): 3.PAR.2.2

Apply part-whole strategies, properties of operations and place value understanding, to solve problems involving addition and subtraction within 10,000. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Justify solutions.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): 3.PAR.3.6

Solve practical, relevant problems involving multiplication and division within 100 using part-whole strategies, visual representations, and/or concrete models.

3rd Grade Math - One-Step Problems Lesson
 
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