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Analyze & Create Shapes

Kindergarten

Alabama Course of Study Standards: 21

Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts (number of sides and vertices or “corners”), and other attributes.
Example: having sides of equal length

Arkansas Academic Standards: K.G.B.4

Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts (e.g., number of sides and vertices/corners), and other attributes (e.g., having sides of equal length)

Note: 2-D shapes: squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, and hexagons
3-D shapes: cube, cone, cylinder, and sphere

Arizona - K-12 Academic Standards: K.G.B.4

Analyze and compare two-dimensional and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts (e.g., number of sides and vertices/corners), and other attributes (e.g., having sides of equal length).

Common Core State Standards: K.G.B.4

Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts (e.g., number of sides and vertices/"corners") and other attributes (e.g., having sides of equal length).

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): K.GSR.8.1

Identify, sort, classify, analyze, and compare twodimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, number of sides and vertices, and other attributes.

North Carolina - Standard Course of Study: K.G.4

Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, attributes and other properties.

New York State Next Generation Learning Standards: K.G.4

Analyze, compare, and sort two- and three- dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts, and other attributes.
e.g., number of sides and vertices/"corners", or having sides of equal length.

Ohio's Learning Standards: K.G.4

Describe and compare two- or three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their commonalities, differences, parts, and other attributes.

Tennessee Academic Standards: K.G.B.4

Describe similarities and differences between two- and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations.

Alabama Course of Study Standards: 22

Model shapes in the world by building them from sticks, clay balls, or other components and by drawing them.

Arkansas Academic Standards: K.G.B.5

Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components (e.g., sticks and clay balls) and by drawing shapes

Common Core State Standards: K.G.B.5

Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components (e.g., sticks and clay balls) and drawing shapes.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): K.GSR.8.3

Use basic shapes to represent specific shapes found in the environment by creating models and drawings.

Mississippi College- and Career-Readiness Standards: K.G.5

Model objects in the world by drawing two-dimensional shapes and building three-dimensional shapes.

North Carolina - Standard Course of Study: K.G.5

Model shapes in the world by:
  • Building and drawing triangles, rectangles, squares, hexagons, circles.
  • Building cubes, cones, spheres, and cylinders.

New York State Next Generation Learning Standards: K.G.5

Model objects in their environment by building and/or drawing shapes.
e.g., using blocks to build a simple representation in the classroom.
Note on and/or: Students should be taught to model objects by building and drawing shapes; however, when answering a question, students can choose to model the object by building or drawing the shape

Ohio's Learning Standards: K.G.5

Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components, e.g., sticks and clay balls, and drawing shapes.

Tennessee Academic Standards: K.G.B.5

Model shapes in the world by building and drawing shapes.

Alabama Course of Study Standards: 23

Use simple shapes to compose larger shapes.
Example: Join two triangles with full sides touching to make a rectangle.

Arkansas Academic Standards: K.G.B.6

Compose two-dimensional shapes to form larger two-dimensional shapes

For example: Join two squares to make a rectangle or join six equilateral triangles to form a hexagon.

Arizona - K-12 Academic Standards: K.G.B.6

Use simple shapes to form composite shapes. For example, “Can you join these two triangles with full sides touching to make a rectangle?”

Common Core State Standards: K.G.B.6

Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes. For example, "Can you join these two triangles with full sides touching to make a rectangle?"

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): K.GSR.8.4

Use two or more basic shapes to form larger shapes.

North Carolina - Standard Course of Study: K.G.6

Compose larger shapes from simple shapes.

New York State Next Generation Learning Standards: K.G.6

Compose larger shapes from simple shapes.
e.g., join two triangles to make a rectangle.

Ohio's Learning Standards: K.G.6

Combine simple shapes to form larger shapes.

Tennessee Academic Standards: K.G.B.6

Compose larger shapes using simple shapes and identify smaller shapes within a larger shape.

Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS): K.6.D

identify attributes of two-dimensional shapes using informal and formal geometric language interchangeably;

Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS): K.6.E

classify and sort a variety of regular and irregular two- and three-dimensional figures regardless of orientation or size; and

Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS): K.6.F

create two-dimensional shapes using a variety of materials and drawings.

Pennsylvania Core Standards: CC.2.3.K.A.2

Analyze, compare, create, and compose two- and three-dimensional shapes.

Florida - Benchmarks for Excellent Student Thinking: MA.K.GR.1.2

Compare two-dimensional figures based on their similarities,differences and positions. Sort two-dimensional figures based on their similarities and differences. Figures are limited to circles, triangles, rectangles and squares.

Florida - Benchmarks for Excellent Student Thinking: MA.K.GR.1.3

Compare three-dimensional figures based on their similarities, differences and positions. Sort three-dimensional figures based on their similarities and differences. Figures are limited to spheres, cubes, cones and cylinders.

Florida - Benchmarks for Excellent Student Thinking: MA.K.GR.1.4

Find real-world objects that can be modeled by a given two-or three-dimensional figure. Figures are limited to circles, triangles, rectangles, squares, spheres, cubes, cones and cylinders.

Florida - Benchmarks for Excellent Student Thinking: MA.K.GR.1.5

Combine two-dimensional figures to form a given composite figure. Figures used to form a composite shape are limited to triangles, rectangles and squares.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): K.GSR.8.1

Identify, sort, classify, analyze, and compare two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, number of sides and vertices, and other attributes.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): K.GSR.8.3

Use basic shapes to represent specific shapes found in the environment by creating models and drawings.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): K.GSR.8.4

Use two or more basic shapes to form larger shapes.

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