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Represent One-Step Problems

3rd Grade

Alabama Course of Study Standards: 1

Illustrate the product of two whole numbers as equal groups by identifying the number of groups and the number in each group and represent as a written expression.

Arkansas Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.1

Interpret products of whole numbers (e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each)

For example: Describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

Arizona - K-12 Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.1

Interpret products of whole numbers as the total number of objects in equal groups (e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each).

Common Core State Standards: Math.3.OA.1 or 3.OA.A.1

Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): 3.PAR.3.6

Solve practical, relevant problems involving multiplication and division within 100 using part-whole strategies, visual representations, and/or concrete models.

North Carolina - Standard Course of Study: 3.OA.1

For products of whole numbers with two factors up to and including 10:
  • Interpret the factors as representing the number of equal groups and the number of objects in each group.
  • Illustrate and explain strategies including arrays, repeated addition, decomposing a factor, and applying the commutative and associative properties.

New York State Next Generation Learning Standards: 3.OA.1

Interpret products of whole numbers.
e.g., Interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. Describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

Ohio's Learning Standards: 3.OA.1

Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 x 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. (Note: These standards are written with the convention that a x b means a groups of b objects each; however, because of the commutative property, students may also interpret 5 x 7 as the total number of objects in 7 groups of 5 objects each).

Tennessee Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.1

Interpret the factors and products in whole number multiplication equations (e.g., 4 × 7 is 4 groups of 7 objects with a total of 28 objects or 4 strings measuring 7 inches each with a total of 28 inches.)

Wisconsin Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.1

Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each.
For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

Alabama Course of Study Standards: 2

Illustrate and interpret the quotient of two whole numbers as the number of objects in each group or the number of groups when the whole is partitioned into equal shares.

Arkansas Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.2

Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers (e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each)

For example: Describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.

Arizona - K-12 Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.2

Interpret whole number quotients of whole numbers (e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each group when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 groups, or as a number of groups when 56 objects are partitioned into equal groups of 8 objects each). See Table 2.

Common Core State Standards: Math.3.OA.2 or 3.OA.A.2

Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): 3.PAR.3.2

Represent single digit multiplication and division facts using a variety of strategies. Explain the relationship between multiplication and division.

North Carolina - Standard Course of Study: 3.OA.2

For whole-number quotients of whole numbers with a one-digit divisor and a one-digit quotient:
  • Interpret the divisor and quotient in a division equation as representing the number of equal groups and the number of objects in each group.
  • Illustrate and explain strategies including arrays, repeated addition or subtraction, and decomposing a factor.

New York State Next Generation Learning Standards: 3.OA.2

Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers.
e.g., Interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. Describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.

Tennessee Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.2

Interpret the dividend, divisor, and quotient in whole number division equations (e.g., 28 ÷ 7 can be interpreted as 28 objects divided into 7 equal groups with 4 objects in each group or 28 objects divided so there are 7 objects in each of the 4 equal groups).

Wisconsin Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.2

Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each.
For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.

Alabama Course of Study Standards: 3

Solve word situations using multiplication and division within 100 involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities; represent the situation using models, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number.

Arkansas Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.3

Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities (e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem)

Arizona - K-12 Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.3

Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities. See Table 2.

Common Core State Standards: Math.3.OA.3 or 3.OA.A.3

Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): 3.PAR.3.3

Apply properties of operations (i.e., commutative property, associative property, distributive property) to multiply and divide within 100.

North Carolina - Standard Course of Study: 3.OA.3

Represent, interpret, and solve one-step problems involving multiplication and division.
  • Solve multiplication word problems with factors up to and including 10. Represent the problem using arrays, pictures, and/or equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
  • Solve division word problems with a divisor and quotient up to and including 10. Represent the problem using arrays, pictures, repeated subtraction and/or equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

New York State Next Generation Learning Standards: 3.OA.3

Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities.
e.g., using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem

Ohio's Learning Standards: 3.OA.3

Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. See Table 2, page 95. Drawings need not show details, but should show the mathematics in the problem. (This applies wherever drawings are mentioned in the Standards.)

Tennessee Academic Standards: 3.OA.A.3

Multiply and divide within 100 to solve contextual problems, with unknowns in all positions, in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., contexts including computations such as 3 × ? = 24, 6 × 16 = ?, ? ÷ 8 = 3, or 96 ÷ 6 = ?) (See Table 2 - Multiplication and Division Situations).

Pennsylvania Core Standards: CC.2.2.3.A.4

Solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain patterns in arithmetic.

Pennsylvania Core Standards: M03.B-O.3.1.6

Create or match a story to a given combination of symbols (+, –, ×, ÷, <, >, and =) and numbers.

Pennsylvania Core Standards: M03.B-O.3.1.7

Identify the missing symbol (+, –, ×, ÷, <, >, and =) that makes a number sentence true.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): 3.PAR.2.2

Apply part-whole strategies, properties of operations and place value understanding, to solve problems involving addition and subtraction within 10,000. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Justify solutions.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): 3.PAR.3.4

Use the meaning of the equal sign to determine whether expressions involving addition, subtraction, and multiplication are equivalent.

Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE): 3.PAR.3.7

Use multiplication and division to solve problems involving whole numbers to 100. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Justify solutions.

3rd Grade Math - Represent One-Step Problems Lesson
 
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